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News and discussion on implementing risk management

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intellectual property

Exceptional circumstances now required for extensions in trademark examination

On January 17, 2020, the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (“CIPO”) published a new Practice Notice which significantly curtails the availability of extensions of time to respond to Office Actions in trademark examination.

 

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Provincial payer quashes attempted drug evergreening strategy

When patents expire on a patented drug product, paving the way for generic competition, the patentee is faced with the challenge of how to replace the revenues that were achieved with the patented product. Ideally, the company’s innovation during the patented product’s life cycle will have led to new products poised to grow as the old patented product’s revenues decline. Often, however, the company’s strategy is to pursue a “product switch,” in which the patented product is replaced with a new product that provides little or no therapeutic improvement but for which no generic competition is imminent.

 

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How much does a Canadian patent cost?

Asking how much it costs to get a patent in Canada is a bit like asking how long a piece of string is. The answer, of course, depends on many different factors, but there are a number of general guidelines that can be used to anticipate likely costs that will be incurred over the lifetime of a patent.

 

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Compliance with the Quebec language requirements for display of trademarks to be ‎mandatory on November 24, 2019‎

This information bulletin addresses the language requirements pertaining to display, in a language other than French, of trademarks on real estate in Quebec.

 

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Going overboard on overbreadth

Under the doctrine of overbreadth (also referred to as “claims broader than the invention” and “covetous claiming”), a patent is invalid if its claims extend beyond the invention. While seemingly a straightforward idea, there is a lack of clarity for how such an allegation of invalidity is approached by the Court.

 

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Franchise article series: Franchising and intellectual property

This article is part of a series of articles that document some key considerations about franchising, including some of the pitfalls and the opportunities.

 

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Competition Bureau releases 2019 Intellectual Property Enforcement Guidelines

As an independent federal law enforcement agency, the Competition Bureau (the “Bureau”) seeks to ensure that Canadian business and consumers prosper in a competitive and innovative marketplace. Keeping with its mandate, the Bureau released its updated Intellectual Property Enforcement Guidelines (“IPEGs”) on March 13, 2019.

 

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Competition Bureau releases updated enforcement guidelines on abuse of dominance and intellectual property

On March 7, 2019, the Competition Bureau (Bureau) published new Abuse of Dominance Enforcement Guidelines (2019 Guidelines). These guidelines supersede the Bureau’s previous guidelines (2012 Guidelines) on sections 78 and 79 of the Competition Act (Act) and set out the Bureau’s approach to these sections of the Act.

 

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Trade secret enforcement in Canada: How rights holders can secure justice

Since the value of a company is increasingly made up of intangible assets, including intellectual property such as trade secrets, as opposed to tangible (e.g., bricks and mortar) assets, protecting and securing those important assets is vital to a company’s long-term success.

 

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Are you making false representations in your franchise agreement?

Is it possible that an otherwise well-written franchise agreement might itself contain false representations by the franchisor?

 

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Foreign patent holders (and lawyers/patent agents): Beware when writing to Canadians

A number of changes to Canada’s intellectual property legislation came into force on Dec. 13, 2018. One of the changes to Canada’s Patent Act is a new subsection relating to written demands.

 

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Bill introducing changes to IP legislation receives swift approval from parliament

Bill C-86, the Budget Implementation Act, 2018, No. 2, (the “Bill”) which makes a number of changes to the Trademarks Act, the Patent Act and the Copyright Act as well as introducing the College of Patent Agents and Trademark Agents Act became law in Canada after receiving Royal Assent on Dec. 13, 2018.

 

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Contractual considerations in robotic process automation and artificial intelligence outsourcing

RPA and AI technologies can be a game-changer for your organization from a commercial perspective, but procuring those technologies and managing the new risk landscape requires a fundamental shift in mindset vis-à-vis a traditional outsourcing contract.

 

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The nascent CRISPR-Cas9 patent landscape in Canada

CRISPR-Cas9 is a technology with the potential for an unimaginable impact on society. CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) allows scientists to edit genomes in living organisms at the cellular level by guiding a “scissor-like” protein to targeted sections of DNA within a cell, and then prompting it to alter or “edit” the DNA in some way.

 

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Rules of the game (Part 1): Copyright protection of video games in Canada

The Canadian Copyright Act does not identify video games as a specific type of work and the courts have not directly stated what type of “work” video games fall under, but the courts have recognized that video games are protected under copyright.

 

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