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Inside Internal Controls

News and discussion on implementing risk management

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Corporate Governance

Setting up a business in Canada? Don’t forget about immigration considerations

Foreign companies and foreign nationals seeking to start business operations in Canada need to be aware of Canadian immigration and entry rules to ensure a smooth entry into the Canadian market.

 

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How effective is your internal audit function? Is it world-class?

When I became a CAE, I started by benchmarking against firms that had a great reputation, either for their business practices or internal audit departments. That is still a good idea and I recommend it.

 

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When it rains, it pours – Supreme Court of Canada allows umbrella purchaser claims

Umbrella purchasers are persons who purchased a product that was neither manufactured nor supplied by the cartel members.

 

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Immigration implications of corporate acquisitions, restructurings and changes

Companies and human resource managers need to be aware of the potential immigration implications that corporate changes, acquisitions or restructurings may have on temporary foreign workers (TFWs) that they employ in Canada.

 

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Common sense talk about risk heat maps and more

Only when the business impact is understood does it make sense to get into the details of which risks to which information assets should be mitigated and how.

 

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Transfer pricing: What’s new in Canada (Part I)

Since 2012, there have been unprecedented developments in Canada and globally in the area of international tax. The sheer volume and complexity of these developments make it difficult for Canadian corporations to keep up on what changes actually impact transfer pricing.

 

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The rising tide of global whistleblower regulations

The whistleblowing landscape has changed substantially over the past few years. High profile cases have spurred new whistleblower protection regulations across the globe.

 

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Allegations and investigations

What we should all note from the news is that a failure to perform an appropriate investigation is a serious source of risk to any organization.

 

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KPMG studies ERM and gets some things right but misses the key point

There’s some good material in KPMG’s Enterprise Risk Management Benchmarking Study, subtitled Evolving to an active, integrated and agile approach amidst change and disruption.

 

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Keeping things in context: B.C. Court of Appeal considers the roles of context and public debate in defamation cases

The B.C. Court of Appeal’s recent decision in Northwest Organics, Limited Partnership v. Fandrich demonstrates the importance of keeping things in context when determining whether an allegedly defamatory statement has a defamatory meaning.

 

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New B.C. Business Corporations Act transparency register requirements: A primer

Beginning on a date to be announced, privately-held B.C. Business Corporations Act (“BCA”) companies ‎will be required to maintain a “transparency register” of “significant individuals”, being individuals who:‎

 

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The board and cyber security

There’s another useful article on Forbes. How to talk to the board about cybersecurity is written by an experienced CIO, John Matthews. Here are some useful excerpts with my highlights:

 

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Alberta Court of Appeal confirms super-priority status of restructuring charges

There were conflicting decisions from Nova Scotia (Rosedale) and Alberta (Canada North) on whether it was possible for CCAA and BIA created super-priority claims to rank senior to the Crown’s deemed trust claims under the fiscal statutes.

 

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Listing in the REIN: Cruel and unusual punishment under the Charter?

Does the automatic listing in the Register of enterprises ineligible for public contracts (REIN) constitute cruel and unusual punishment within the meaning of section 12 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms?

 

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Regulations for cannabis edibles, extracts and topicals to take effect in October 2019

On June 14, 2019, the Government of Canada announced its final amendments to the Cannabis Regulations (the “Regulations”), which set the rules for the production and sale of cannabis edibles, extracts and topicals – the three new classes of cannabis products that will be legal for recreational use in Canada later this year.

 

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