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Inside Internal Controls

News and discussion on implementing risk management

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Where does Canada stand on privacy?

Canada, like many countries, must answer a fundamental question: How does it achieve its law enforcement and national security objectives while also protecting and respecting the privacy rights of its citizens? “We hope the current administration and its privacy opponents can reach reasonable compromises that allow both groups to achieve their desired outcomes” Chris Stevens, CIPP/US, CIPP/C, CIPP/E, CIPP/G, CIPM, CIPT, and Steve Holland, CIPM, write. In this exclusive for The Privacy Advisor, they look at the high-stakes issues facing Canada’s quest to balance the two priorities and whether Privacy Commissioner Daniel Therrien is the right man to help it do so.

 

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Angry bloggers beware! – Your anonymity is not guaranteed… unless you defame a politician

One year ago, I wrote about the Canadian courts’ trend of ordering Internet service providers or website operators to reveal the identity of anonymous bloggers, when it is alleged that the bloggers had defamed the plaintiff. A recent decision by the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, suggests that, when the plaintiff is a politician, the bloggers may continue to remain anonymous.

 

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Neutering net neutrality

In its net neutrality decision, the CRTC says “throttling if necessary, but not necessarily throttling.”

 

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