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Inside Internal Controls

News and discussion on implementing risk management

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Anonymous blogger – reveal thyself!

In a recent decision from the Ontario courts, a judge has ordered an anonymous blogger to reveal his or her identity to the plaintiff, so the plaintiff can sue them for defamation. There is only one catch: how does one go about enforcing such order?

 

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Angry bloggers beware! – Your anonymity is not guaranteed… unless you defame a politician

One year ago, I wrote about the Canadian courts’ trend of ordering Internet service providers or website operators to reveal the identity of anonymous bloggers, when it is alleged that the bloggers had defamed the plaintiff. A recent decision by the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, suggests that, when the plaintiff is a politician, the bloggers may continue to remain anonymous.

 

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Angry bloggers beware! – Your anonymity is not guaranteed

Is your boss or co-worker getting on your nerves? Are you irritated with your neighbour? Do you feel like venting out by writing some nasty stuff about them on Twitter or on a blog? If you do it anonymously, no harm done, right?

 

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