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Refresher on financial statistics and metrics

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One of the ironies in business is that insufficient data analysis is often caused by too much information, not too little. A few well chosen statistics that highlight critical trends and pinpoint areas that require follow-up may be much more useful than reams of reports. There are four standard ways of analyzing financial information:

  • Variance (change) from last year, budget, etc., as a dollar amount or a percentage
  • Vertical analysis for a particular fiscal period, expressing all items as a percentage of the top line (normally sales)
  • Horizontal analysis shows percentage changes of a particular item over time
  • Ratio analysis compares relations between two numbers and how they vary over time

For the revenue cycle, many standard measurements are based on vertical analysis of the income statement; that is, looking at gross margin, cost of sales or operating profit as a percentage of sales. Other measures use horizontal analysis; that is, how sales have changed over time.

Gross margin

The gross margin measures the amount of profit being generated by the operation of the business before selling and administrative expenses and non-operating costs such as interest and taxes. It measures the efficiency of the sales and production processes. Gross margin may be expressed directly as a number (Net Sales less Cost of Goods Sold) or as a percentage:

Gross Margin = (Net Sales – Cost of Goods Sold) / Net Sales

The trend in gross margin over time can be a critical leading indicator of positive or negative factors in the business. This analysis should be done by product or product line to permit detailed comparisons and review changes over time. Competitors’ gross margins can be gleaned from their annual reports.

Operating profit

The operating profit measures the amount of profit generated by the operation of the business before non-operating costs such as interest and taxes. It measures the efficiency of the entire business process before financing costs and taxes. Operating profit may be expressed directly as a number (Net Sales less Cost of Goods Sold less Selling and Administrative Expense) or as a percentage:

Operating Profit = (Net Sales – Cost of Goods Sold – Selling and Administrative Expense) / Net Sales

The trend in operating profit over time can be a critical leading indicator of positive or negative factors in the business. This analysis should be done by product or product line to permit detailed comparisons and review changes over time. Competitors’ operating profits can be gleaned from their annual reports.

In addition, Statistics Canada publishes extensive information by industry. For example, Quarterly Financial Statistics for Enterprises (catalogue number 61-008) is available at www.statcan.gc.ca. It includes information on the last five quarters.

Selling expense ratio

The selling expense ratio measures the efficiency of the sales force by expressing Selling Expense as a percentage of Net Sales:

Selling Expense Ratio = Selling Expense / Net Sales

For this measure, the important information lies in the trend, not the absolute number. Either Net Sales or Gross Sales may be used as long as the same number is used consistently over time. Net Sales is Gross Sales, less discounts and allowances.

prod-fappSee the Revenue Cycle chapter of Finance and Accounting PolicyPro from First Reference for more details.

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Jeffrey Sherman

Chief financial officer, author, lecturer and professor focussing on corporate finance at Atrium Mortgage Investment Corporation, Canadian Mortgage Capital Corp., Trimel Pharmaceuticals Corporation, and Anagram Services
Jeffrey D. Sherman, BComm, MBA, CIM, FCA, is a director or CFO of several public companies and has had over 20 years of executive management experience. He is the author of Finance and Accounting PolicyPro, Not-for-Profit PolicyPro and Information Technology PolicyPro (guides to governance, procedures and internal control, all published by First Reference and the CPA). Read more
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