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News and discussion on implementing risk management

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Privacy Compliance and Management

Lenovo and Superfish: Proposed class action proceeds on privacy tort and statutes

It has been reported that a partial settlement may have been reached with Superfish, in a U.S. class action against both defendants. The settlement reportedly includes Superfish’s cooperation with the plaintiffs by disclosing over 2.8 million additional files and providing Superfish witnesses for a potential trial. The Canadian proposed class action is very much in its infancy. It remains to be seen how the class action will evolve in Canada.

 

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Canadian government suspends CASL private right of action

The Canadian federal government has announced that it has suspended the coming into force of the private right of action under Canada’s anti-spam legislation (CASL), originally scheduled to come into force on July 1, 2017.

 

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CASL’s soon-to-be-enacted private right of action brings risk of class proceedings

On July 1, 2017, the private right of action under Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL) will come into force.

 

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Don’t outsmart yourself: AI and compliance

I’m a big fan of artificial intelligence. The older I get, the more I appreciate that real intelligence needs all the help it can get. Corporate ethics and compliance officers, however, need to pause before betting big on AI as a solution to all our needs.

 

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The current state of risk oversight: Useful or useless?

All the surveys, including this one, report that executives do not believe risk management practices at their organization are making a significant contribution to the development and execution of their strategies.

 

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CASL’s private right of action for Competition Act reviewable conduct

While much has been written about the impending CASL private rights of action, less has been said about the new private right of action CASL will tack on to the Competition Act for misrepresentations in electronic messages.

 

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Ontario court decides ground-breaking online copyright case

Trader Corp v CarGurus Inc, a recent Ontario Superior Court decision, breaks a staggering amount of new ground in Canadian copyright law.

 

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Real answers to common questions on cybersecurity

Every day there is something in the news about organizations generally of all different sizes that have been breached and have had to deal with the impact of the loss, compromise or destruction of data. Making key decision-makers aware of the general threat landscape is helpful, but more helpful is making them aware of the threat landscape specific to your organization.

 

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Cyber and reputation risk are dominoes

As I was reading the book, I realized that I have a problem with organizations placing separate attention to reputation risk and its management. It’s simply an element, which should not be overlooked, in how any organization manages risk – or, I should say, how it considers what might happen in its decision-making activities.

 

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Cyberbullying and revenge porn: An update on Canadian law

The current nature of social media and, more broadly, the Digital Age, continues to create challenges for legislators and law enforcement officials alike. One such challenge arises in the cyberbullying context, where intimate (or otherwise private) images are uploaded to the Internet. These files can be copied, forwarded and shared instantaneously, making them seemingly impossible to delete retrospectively. There have been developments in both common law in statute.

 

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When an acceptable level of risk is not acceptable

We are used to identifying a risk, analyzing the potential consequences and their likelihood, and then establishing a ‘risk level’. We evaluate whether the level of risk is acceptable or not, based on risk appetite, risk criteria, or the like. But is that sufficient?

 

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Lawful access: The Privacy Commissioner reiterates its position

Patricia Kosseim, Senior General Counsel and Director General, Legal Services, Policy, Research and Technology Analysis for the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, was asked, at the request of Commission’s counsel, to provide an overview of the legislation for protecting privacy in Canada and to answer questions about lawful access issues from a federal perspective.

 

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CCOs say policies are getting stronger; adoption of technology – not so much

KPMG recently published its latest survey of chief compliance officers. The report highlights the increasing value of effective Compliance. It also reveals growing pains of our industry, specifically in maximizing efficiencies.

 

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Is there a duty of device security? U.S. regulator fires warning shot over obligations of IoT manufacturers

A complaint filed by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission against D-Link Corporation, a Taiwanese computer networking equipment manufacturer, and its U.S. subsidiary, is raising questions about the extent of responsibility that networking equipment manufacturers may have for the security of their products, and how much of that responsibility rests with consumers and end users.

 

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Privacy law: The Supreme Court of Canada’s Royal Bank of Canada v. Trang

The Supreme Court of Canada released a landmark decision giving important guidance on when personal financial information may be disclosed under Canada’s federal privacy law, the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act.

 

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