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Inside Internal Controls

News and discussion on implementing risk management

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Backup and Disaster Planning

The basics of risk management

I want to congratulate David Hillson (a.k.a. the Risk Doctor) for his video explaining his view of risk management basics. In Risk management basics: What exactly is it?, he takes less than five minutes to sum up risk management with six questions:

 

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Security breach notification and reporting requirements are now in force under Canada’s PIPEDA

Canada’s long-awaited federal private-sector data breach notification and reporting requirements came into force on November 1, 2018.

 

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UK government guidance on risk and cyber: the very good and the very bad

The National Cyber Security Center (NCSC) is a part of the UK’s Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ). If you are like me, you may have only heard about GCHQ in an unflattering context, that of working with US intelligence agencies to spy on foreign heads of state and hack foreign agencies.

 

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Ten considerations for a cybersecurity incident response plan

If you ask a group of cybersecurity experts what should be included in a Cybersecurity Incident Response Plan (“CIRP”), you will get a wide variety of answers. Happily, many of those answers contain similar themes including these ten important considerations your organization should be aware of when creating and managing a CIRP.

 

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Treating cyber as a business problem

Cyber risk can only be communicated to leadership in a way that is meaningful and actionable, enabling them to make informed and intelligent decisions, if it is done using business language.

 

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Deloitte Internal Audit 3.0 has major flaws

Earlier this year, Deloitte published Internal Audit 3.0, The future of Internal Audit is now. It’s great that they are encouraging internal audit departments to change so they can meet modern demands, but their presentation that they are offering something novel and disruptive is way off the mark.

 

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Uniting risk management with strategic planning

Who can argue that the consideration of what might happen (what some refer to as risk) should be part of the strategic planning process? Objectives and strategies should be set only after thinking carefully about where you are, what is happening around you, and what may happen in the future.

 

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Emerging risks: who is watching?

Who should be alert and watching for emerging risks: things that might happen (a better expression than the ‘R’ word, ‘risk’, because of its negative impression) that might affect the achievement of enterprise objectives?

 

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What can employers do to prevent security breaches from the inside?

Until employers start to prioritise information security, then the culture won’t change and employers will continue to make mistakes. But if those mistakes do happen and data is breached, then employers need to be smart and act quickly to ensure the best possible defence is available.

 

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New information about cyber risk is alarming

According to the 2018 Sentinel One Global Ransomware Report, it appears that the frequency of attacks are surprisingly high, but the extent of damage is surprisingly low.

 

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Is there an ROI for investing in cyber or information security?

IS ROI on cyber really as high as it may seem at first glance? At some point, it may be better to consider cyber risk as a “cost of doing business”. If you can’t actually reduce the likelihood of a breach, can you at least increase the likelihood of prompt detection and response?

 

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So what if the risk is high?

Most organizations cannot afford to reduce every single risk to what some practitioners would deem acceptable. Providing actionable information about all the things that might happen, not by using terms like High, Medium, or Low, but in specific business terms will help evaluate which risks to take.

 

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Are you managing risk or are you managing the organization?

Stop managing risk – manage the business. Stop talking about accepting or managing risk and start talking about taking the right risks through informed and intelligent decisions.

 

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My cyber confession

Should we give up auditing information security and the management of cyber risk? Not at all. But we should do so with eyes wide open. We should recognize the limitations of our knowledge, tools and techniques and the likelihood that hackers have new techniques that are unknown both to auditors and management.

 

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Talking sense about technology risk and cyber

You have to have sponsorship from the CEO and throughout the company to really understand and diagnose IT risks, data security risks and business risks, and then prioritize them.

 

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