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News and discussion on implementing risk management

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Anti-spam, Do-not-Call

Canada’s anti-spam law is hurting MSPs

The Canadian Government wants to cut down on the number of spam people receive. This is a good thing, right? However, the way they’ve gone about doing this is hurting businesses.

 

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Canadian government suspends CASL private right of action

The Canadian federal government has announced that it has suspended the coming into force of the private right of action under Canada’s anti-spam legislation (CASL), originally scheduled to come into force on July 1, 2017.

 

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CASL’s soon-to-be-enacted private right of action brings risk of class proceedings

On July 1, 2017, the private right of action under Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL) will come into force.

 

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CASL’s private right of action for Competition Act reviewable conduct

While much has been written about the impending CASL private rights of action, less has been said about the new private right of action CASL will tack on to the Competition Act for misrepresentations in electronic messages.

 

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CASL and private right of action

Canada has the most onerous anti–spam/anti–malware law (CASL) in the world. In less than a year, July 1, 2017, it is going to become even worse. That’s when the private right of action comes into force.

 

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Top 10 most read Inside Internal Controls posts 2016 & Season’s Greetings

We are signing off with a list of the top 10 most read Inside Internal Controls posts 2016. Privacy issues and director’s liability seem to have been hot topics this year with several blog posts on the topics making it on the list. The top 10 most read Inside Internal Controls posts 2016 Director’s liability […]

 

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CASL made clearer: First CRTC decision released

Until now, the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission’s CASL enforcement actions have taken the form of settlements reached in confidential negotiations between the Enforcement Branch and the company. But this decision, released on October 26, 2016, is significant because it is the first CASL enforcement decision to provide guidance on compliance. The decision contains several important lessons about regulation of commercial electronic messages in Canada before class action enforcement opens on July 1, 2017.

 

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CRTC’s reminder on record-keeping for CASL compliance

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission issued an enforcement advisory directing businesses and individuals to consider the importance of record-keeping pursuant to Canada’s anti-spam legislation (CASL). Under CASL, the onus remains on the sender of commercial electronic messages (CEMs) to demonstrate that it had the proper consents in place to send CEMs (whether implied or explicit).

 

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Proving consent under CASL: CRTC issues enforcement advisory notice

The Canadian Radio–television and Telecommunications Commission has issued an Enforcement Advisory notice directed to businesses and individuals that send commercial electronic messages (CEMs) as part of their commercial activities. Notably, the sender of CEMs must have the consent of the recipient to send them a message, or else the message is considered spam.

 

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Private right of action under Canada’s Anti-Spam Law (CASL)

As of July 1, 2017, individuals and organizations will be entitled to institute a “private right of action” before the courts against those that contravene certain provisions of Canada’s Anti-Spam Law (“CASL”). In the event of a contravention of the message rules in CASL, a monetary penalty up to a maximum of $1,000,000 per day may be imposed. This private right of action should be taken seriously right now. From this perspective and building on previous publications, this bulletin discusses this new mechanism.

 

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“Do Not Call” means Do Not Call: CRTC enters into MOU with FTC on Spam and Unsolicited Telecommunications

On March 24, 2016, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (“CRTC”) signed a memorandum of understanding (“MOU”) with the United States Federal Trade Commission.[1] This MOU is an effort by Canada and the United States to work together on anti-spam enforcement measures, and expressly refers to unsolicited telecommunications, unsolicited commercial electronic messages (spam), and other unlawful electronic threats (e.g., malware and botnets).

 

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Marketing to Canadians – A plethora of regulatory considerations

Businesses marketing to Canadians may be surprised at the number and scope of laws that may impact marketing efforts. Previous Releases provided updated coverage of some of these laws, including privacy and anti-spam laws. This Release updates Policy OP 6.12 – Do Not Call Registry, which includes coverage of the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules that govern telemarketing activities. Listed below are 7 of the many considerations that businesses marketing to Canadians must consider. Some will be explored in detail in upcoming Releases:

 

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Fill in the blanks and test your “Do Not Call” skills

Complying with the Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules (UTR) includes the National Do Not Call List (DNCL) Rules, the Telemarketing Rules and the Automatic Dialing-Announcing Devices (ADAD) Rules. Test your knowledge to see if you understand these obligations.

 

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Ransomware threat to Canadian businesses broadens

Recent hacker attacks — including the first successful attack on an Apple computer, and several attacks on U.S. and Canadian hospitals — have reminded Canadian businesses of the need to be vigilant about the danger posed by ransomware.

 

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Insights from the I Spy conference on big data and privacy

On Friday February 5, 2016, we attended the I Spy: Opportunities and Challenges Surrounding Privacy and Big Data conference organized by the Osgoode JD/MBA Students’ Association. Speakers from industry, government and private practice explored the challenge organizations face in maximizing insights from big data while maintaining a respect for individual privacy.

 

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