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Inside Internal Controls

News and discussion on implementing risk management

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Author Archive - Ethics &Compliance Matters ™, Navex Global ®

Ethics & Compliance Matters™ is the official blog of NAVEX Global®. All articles posted on the Inside Internal Controls blog originally appeared on NAVEX Global’s Ethics and Compliance Matters Blog. The blog leverage the news, insights and best practices you find here to stay ahead of GRC trends, and take your compliance program to the next level. Read more

We’re at a tipping point for third-party risk management

If indeed creating a culture of ethics, integrity and respect is the top objective of more than two-thirds of organizations, we could start seeing the results very soon when it comes to a new wave of investing in third-party systems.

 

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The “Weinstein Clause” may mark a new era of social due diligence

To gauge the civility of an organization’s culture, adequate policies and training are not enough. The behavior and accountability of top leadership play a key role. You can’t delegate ethics. And it seems the “Weinstein Clause” indicates that boards are finally beginning to understand that.

 

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What is an internal control, really?

What is a control, at an abstract level: what is it supposed to achieve, and how is it supposed to operate within an organization?

 

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Has #MeToo changed the game for board-level compliance training?

Organizations should be applauded for their improvements in board compliance training. But they need to keep working, to channel their increased focus on board awareness and to make sure that their directors are getting the right training to truly lead their organizations.

 

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Cultural shifts on sexual harassment redefine “the line” for acceptable behavior

The recent media attention on sexual harassment in the workplace, arising from #MeToo and the publicity surrounding allegations of wrongdoing by powerful celebrities and executives, has resulted in a quantum boost for awareness of the issues.

 

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Learning the basics on GDPR’s right to be forgotten

To manage the Europe Union’s new GDPR properly, ethics and compliance officers need to consider many parts within their organization, from IT capabilities, exception clauses, and customer service demands. And these parts must be managed and organized in such a way that they work together so that they do not fall apart.

 

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Ethics & compliance leaders could use a good dose of marketing 101

Just as a brand isn’t what the company says about itself, but what other people say about the company, employee behavior is the final expression of your E&C marketing program’s success.

 

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10 top ways to be a wildly effective compliance officer

Competition law

To be wildly effective, compliance officers should have a positive working relationship with the other functions in the business, especially Legal, Audit and Human Resources.

 

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Supreme Court rules on whistleblower protection case: Don’t lose focus on what really drives external reporting

What should organizations be doing to create an environment where employees are confident in their ability to raise issues internally?

 

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Directors need to step outside the boardroom on the issue of sexual harassment

Empathy is not a term often used in regard to boards of directors, but it needs to be. It cannot continue to be a trait that corporate leaders shed as they climb the ranks. Leaders need to think outside the boardroom and own their role in eliminating sexual harassment in the workplace.

 

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You can’t delegate ethics on the issue of sexual harassment

There is no denying the alarming scope and prevalence of workplace sexual harassment. For the past several months, it seems not a day goes by without news of another troubling example of egregious workplace behavior. Victims of sexual harassment have moved beyond simply speaking up; they are now standing up, speaking out and making sure their voices are heard.

 

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Name is psychological safety but my friends call me culture

psychological safety

Psychological safety refers to the climate in which people operate, think and speak. A psychologically safe climate is one in which people feel comfortable being themselves and expressing themselves without the fear of retribution. This concept is directly applicable to the group dynamics of teams trying to spitball the next big thing; however, when we expand this view to our largest corporate group, the employee base, we start to see a lot of overlap with a true speak-up culture.

 

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Internal controls for gift giving this holiday season

Many companies effectively minimize the risk of inappropriate gifts through stringent pre-approval requirements because a sufficiently robust and enforced pre-approval policy can reduce the number of gifts simply because of the headache of getting the pre-approval. This has the added benefit of ensuring enforcement of internal controls, largely because of the reduced volume of gifts being included in expense reports.

 

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What a CEO needs to hear to invest more in compliance – strategy

Investment decisions are strategic. They are based on a business case and cost/benefit analysis. Expense decisions are more tactical, and are often associated with things an organization must do to keep running – like meet a regulatory requirement so they can check the box.

 

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High-profile sexual harassment claims show a toxic culture can be a product defect

The rapid demise of the Weinstein Co., once one of the most successful movie studios in Hollywood, should have every CEO wondering: What skeletons does my organization have in the closet? And how could they destroy the value of my company’s brands, or the company itself?

 

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